Amino Acid Content

stack of booksGreetings! For all of the students searching for the Amino Acid content that used to be here, please follow this link for the Kindle edition and this link for the paperback edition. Thanks!

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Amino Acids Therapy “Study” ≈ Week 2

Written by: Rebecca Baird, July 8, 2010

The second week of my amino acid therapy study brought with it some interesting discoveries. The first discovery was that my energy levels are way up; no afternoon sleepies, more than enough energy to go above and beyond the call of duty, and no afternoon or evening chocolate cravings. This is indeed a miracle and I thank God every day for this revelation which He has shown to me.

The second discovery was that I was beginning to feel over energized so that meant that I needed to lessen my L-tyrosine supplementation. I never thought I would see the day when I had too much energy, but there it is.

The third discovery was that my husband is feeling better than he has for many years. He has been taking the amino acid supplements as well and has a much better outlook on life. Many people have described him as stoic and serious, but since he has been taking the amino supplements he has brightened up and is excited about life. One of our sons remarked that he had never seen him so happy; this, again, is a miracle to thank God for.

One of the things which I have a great deal of trouble with, is worrying about how many calories I am consuming. I have to retrain myself that calories are not the enemy; they are the fuel my body needs to maintain metabolic equilibrium (homeostasis). The enemy is simple carbohydrates and sugar which need to be deleted from our diets. Simple carbohydrates are refined foods such as white bread, cakes, soft drinks, canned fruits, puddings, and any other item made with refined sugar, sugar substitutes like saccharin or aspartame, or white all-purpose flour. I am really concentrating on making all our foods from scratch and using whole grain and unrefined sugars like honey or unrefined cane sugar.

I have increased my breakfast to include 3 scrambled eggs, toast (made with homemade bread) or pita bread (homemade as well), melon slices or apple slices, and half caf coffee (I am really working on weaning myself off of this). This increase in breakfast has really made a difference throughout the day. I am feeling less drained by mid morning; I get up at 4:30am so mid morning to me is about 8:30am. I have a healthy snack of carrots or celery and humus (homemade) or peanut butter in between meals so that I am not putting myself in starvation mode. Lunch consists of homemade soup or a sandwich made with ham (no nitrates), tuna, chicken (home roasted), or egg salad and a green salad. Dinner usually is variable, but basically consists of a protein, lots of veggies, and cottage cheese. (I will be posting recipes for the homemade menu items in the coming days.)

Food For Thought ≈ Nutrition Enlightenment

Written by: Rebecca Baird, July 3, 2010

If the diseases, which plague millions of people in the world today, are preventable, then why are so many people dying from them? I think we all want to preserve our lives as long as possible, so what is the secret to living a long and healthy life? The answer to this question is that we need to be free from the diseases which have been proven to be preventable. The diseases I am speaking of are diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, high cholesterol, cancer, depression, thyroid disorders, Alzheimer’s, and many more. In many cases, people are turning to modern medicine to help them control the symptoms of these diseases, which in turn causes many harmful, and in some cases deadly, side effects. Most of these diseases were nonexistent during the time of our ancestors, which is why I began researching to see what the difference is between then and now. From this research, I have found that many of these diseases are caused by poor diets and others are caused by missing ingredients or nutrient deficiencies in the food we eat. For instance, diabetes is caused by eating simple carbohydrates and refined foods like sugar and white flour which are devoid of any real nutrients and are responsible for an increase in insulin levels causing the pancreas to become exhausted.  Many studies have shown that diabetes can be controlled and sometimes cured by eating exclusively whole foods; whole grains, fresh fruit and vegetables, organically grown meats, eggs, and dairy products, and unrefined foods. Many health studies have also shown that hypertension, heart disease, high cholesterol, cancer, depression, thyroid disorders, and others are also controlled by the same formula used to control, or cure, diabetes. (1)

Experts have also proven that certain amino acids, which are lacking in processed foods, can prevent or cure Alzheimer’s disease. According to Prescription for Dietary Wellness by Phyllis A. Balch, studies suggest that acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) may delay the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Russell L. Blaylock, author of Health and Nutrition Secrets states that acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) ALC may have a “significant capacity to slow, and even reverse, the effects of aging on the brain. Dr. Ray Sahelia states that these benefits are a result of the ability ALC has of traveling through the blood-brain barrier; the ability to keep mitochondria working efficiently by clearing them of toxic fatty-acid metabolites; and the way it helps regenerate neurons damaged by free radical damage. According to the Woman’s Encyclopedia Of Natural Healing, studies suggest that mental deterioration in Alzheimer’s patients can be slowed by supplementation of iron, vitamins B6 and B12, coenzyme Q10, and acetyl-L-carnitine.

You see the nutrition which is present in whole, unrefined foods, grown without pesticides and artificial fertilizers, are nutrient rich and contribute to the nutritional needs of the body whereas foods grown using chemical pesticides and fertilizers lack in nutrients because the land used to grow these foods has been sapped of all the naturally occurring nutritive substances. (2)

Since proper and complete nutrition is the key to a long and healthy life, then where do we get the foods needed to ensure proper nutrition? We can get most of the nutrition we need from whole foods, but we will need to add nutritional support in the form of supplements in order to reverse the effects of poor nutrition. Some of the nutrients which may spare us from preventable diseases are alpha-lipoic acid, acetyl-L-carnitine, vitamins B1, B6 and B12, coenzyme Q10, vitamin E, calcium, magnesium, zinc, and a complete amino acid supplement (3). Mark Hyman MD and Mark Liponis MD, authors of Ultra prevention, state that the antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid and amino acid acetyl-L-carnitine increase the body’s healing mechanisms, as well as prevent disease and improve symptoms for a wide range of conditions, including diabetes, neuropathy, liver disease, hypertension, hearing loss, and nerve damage in the brain associated with conditions such as Parkinson’s disease.

(1) Fallon, S. (1999, 2001) Nourishing Traditions. New Trends Publishing, Inc, Washington, DC.
(2) Hunter, B. (2006) A Whole Foods Primer. Basic Health Publications, Inc. Laguna Beach, CA.
(3) Ross, J. (1999) The Diet Cure. Penguin Group, New York, New York.

Hiperlipidemia: Lowering Lipid Levels the Natural Way

Written by: Rebecca Baird, April 20, 2010

Excessive triglyceride levels are caused by processed sugars and refined food products, so it is reasonable that healing begins with natural products and a diet which has little, if any, refined foods in it. Eating fewer simple carbohydrates and eating more healthy fats can aid the body in breaking down fat stores to use for energy. This helps lower triglycerides in the blood (Schwarzbein and Deville, 1999).

Cheeses, cream, milk, and butter should be made from whole milk and if possible unpasteurized as raw milk has been shown to be superior to pasteurized milk in protecting against infection, diarrhea, tooth decay, and many types of cancer (Weston A. Price Foundation, 2000). Foods which contain saturated fat, such as whole milk and cheese, do not cause fat build-up in the blood, in the form of triglycerides, and do not cause heart disease. The most recent information concerning this comes from a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. The data which was gathered “concluded that there is no relationship between the intake of saturated fat and the incidence of heart disease or stroke” (Siri-Tarino, et al, 2010).

The foods which will aid in lowering her triglyceride count are meat and poultry which are hormone-free, antibiotic-free and if possible organic. Eggs are a great source of protein and do not contribute to cholesterol levels in the blood (BBC News, 2009). Cheese should be used in moderation unless it is made from unprocessed milk. Fish and shellfish are great sources of protein; stay away from canned or processed fish which may contain nitrates. Nuts and seeds are a good source of non-essential proteins and a source of good fat. Packaged meats and deli meats all contain high amounts of sodium and preservatives and should be avoided. Avoid holding meats for long periods of time in the refrigerator because the oxidization process begins within a few days and can be the cause of free radical damage within the body. Fats are necessary for the absorption of many fat soluble vitamins. Fats which are good for cooking are canola oil, grape seed oil, olive oil and peanut oil. Cold pressed oils are the best oils to use. Non starchy vegetables, which are fibrous in content, slow down digestion. Eating many non starchy vegetables at each meal is a good way to help lower lipid levels in the blood. Avoid eating any processed grains; the body needs the whole grain and all nutrients which are available from the grain (Fallon and Enig, 1999-2001). Also only eat whole grain bread or organic grain bread. Citrus fruits have been linked to lower lipid blood levels as well as lowering the risk of some cancers. Many fresh organic fruits, such as blueberries, strawberries, blackberries, and cherries are responsible for fighting off free radicals and lowering lipid levels in the blood (Hunter, 2006).

BBC News (2009). Regular eggs ‘no harm to health’. Retrieved on April 16, 2010 from http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/7882850.stm.

Fallon, S. and Enig, M. G. (1999, 2001). Nourishing Traditions. The cookbook that challenges politically correct nutrition and diet dictocrats. Revised second edition. New Trends Publishing, Inc. Washington, DC.

Hunter, B. (2006). A Whole Foods Primer. A comprehensive, instructive, and enlightening guide to the world of whole foods. Basic Health Publications, Inc. Laguna Beach, CA.

Schwarzbein, D. and Deville, N. (1999). The Schwarzbein Principle. Published by Health Communications, Inc. Deerfield Beach, FL.

Siri-Tarino, P., Sun, Q., Hu, F. & Krauss, R. (January 13, 2010) Meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies evaluating the association of saturated fat with cardiovascular disease. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Retrieved on April 18, 2010 from http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/abstract/ajcn.2009.27725v1.

Weston A. Price Foundation (2000) What’s Wrong with “Politically Correct” Nutrition? Health Topics – ABC’s of Nutrition. Retrieved on April 20, 2010 from http://www.westonaprice.org/What-s-Wrong-with-Politically-Correct-Nutrition.html.

The skinny on fat.

Written by: Rebecca Baird, May 13, 2010

Conventional nutrition professionals would ask me why I think that a diet which includes raw, whole fat, dairy products would be a good choice for a patient who has elevated cholesterol. A conventional nutrition professional would say that the patient should be on a low fat diet in order to lower the cholesterol content in the blood.
Foods which contain saturated fat, such as whole milk and cheese, do not cause fat build-up in the blood, in the form of triglycerides or cholesterol, and do not cause heart disease. The most recent information concerning this comes from a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. The data which was gathered “concluded that there is no relationship between the intake of saturated fat and the incidence of heart disease or stroke” (Siri-Tarino, et al, 2010).
Cheeses, cream, milk, and butter should be made from whole milk and if possible unpasteurized as raw milk has been shown to be superior to pasteurized milk in protecting against infection, diarrhea, tooth decay, and many types of cancer (Weston A. Price Foundation, 2010).

References
Siri-Tarino, P., Sun, Q., Hu, F.& Krauss, R. (January 13, 2010) Meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies evaluating the association of saturated fat with cardiovascular disease. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Retrieved on May 13, 2010 from http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/abstract/ajcn.2009.27725v1.
Weston A. Price Foundation (2000) What’s Wrong with “Politically Correct” Nutrition? Health Topics – ABC’s of Nutrition. Retrieved on May 13, 2010 from http://www.westonaprice.org/What-s-Wrong-with-Politically-Correct-Nutrition.html.